Dubrovnik Minceta Tower

Dubrovnik Minceta Tower

Once your seaway takes you to the South of Adriatic, it will be a shame not to step from your luxury yacht and explore the Pearl of Adriatic –The city of Dubrovnik. What is so special about Dubrovnik? In this article I will lead you through this medieval city and its cultural attractions.

Old town is an excellent mix of old buildings, narrow streets, cafés, shops and visitors from all over the world, including many keen sailors and those seeking an exclusive yachting experience in the Adriatic. The old town’s city centre is traffic free, and is of a great size to walk through its history in just one day.  First of all, there is something untouchable about Dubrovnik’s history. First known inhabitants of the Dubrovnik region were Romans, who were mainly populating the area near today’s Cavtat , which at the time was a Roman colony called Epidaurum.  City of Epidaurum was a large and prosperous Roman colony numbering approximately 40 000 people but unfortunately it was completely destroyed in the earthquake and during barbarian invasions. Refugees, who were running from barbarians, inhabited the nearby island and there they formed a new colony – Ragusium. In the 7th century Croats came to this region, during the Slav migrations and made a wooden settlement called Dubrovnik. In the 11th century the channel between two settlements was filled up with soil. This channel became the most famous street – Stradun. Because of its position on the trade crossroads, sheltered harbor, quality oak wood, the city becomes a trade center. Until 13th century Dubrovnik was growing rapidly as a major trading centre.  This was mainly due to the export of silver from mines in Bosnia and permission by Bosnian King at the time for all Dubrovnik citizens, to trade freely and travel freely across his Kingdom.  The document, Povelja Kulina Bana is currently kept at one of the Dubrovnik museums and is one of the oldest such documents where absolute power by a King is devolved, similar to famous Magna Carta which was written some 20 years later.  Around this time, Dubrovnik was under the Venice authority for around 150 years, but the city survived the rule and slowly became the aristocratic republic – Republica Ragusiana.

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